PKPolitics Discuss » Current Issues

New PTV MD Yousaf Beg Mirza- another diamond in the Government's crown.

(20 posts)
  1. olive branch


    An inquiry report issued by the world's most prestigious bodyworking for the rights of journalists, International Federation of Journalists, IFJ, has declared that MD Dunya News Yousaf Beg Mirza's acts mounted to sexual harassment of Maheen Usmani, Dunya News senior correspondent.

    In a fact finding, lengthy inquiry conducted after the complaint of Maheen Usmani, the IFJ has given the verdict that by national and international definitions the late night phone call by YBM and the suggestive conversation That followed is sexual harassment of a female journalist who was his subordinate.

    The IFJ also referred to the definition of "sexual harassment" in the recently enacted anti sexual harassment law by the government of Pakistan and asked the government, PFUJ and media house owners to take strict measures to punish the culprits and avoid such happenings in future.

    The IFJ, has also urged the PFUJ and National Press Club to avoid meaningless territorial disputes in such serious matters and instead provide total support to the victims even if they are not the "registered" members of the journalists bodies.

    The IFJ had formed a probe committee on the complaint of Maheen Usmani, ex Dunya News correspondent, who had resigned after MD Dunya News Yousaf Beg Mirza harassed her.

    The journalist community, specially women journalists in Pakistan, have welcomed IFJ fact finding report and have appealed the PFUJ, NPC and other representative bodies to implement the recommendations of the IFJ in letter and spirit to punish creeps such as YBM who try to exploit employees working under them.

    Posted 3 years ago on 14 Oct 2010 12:01 #
  2. olive branch

    Is there not a single credible,honest and upright person left in Pakistani Media to be given yet another key post to...!!!????

    Posted 3 years ago on 14 Oct 2010 12:09 #
  3. KHAN_Sahib

    Harassment of females at work, shopping centers and generally in the community is a common thing in Pakistan (and all around the world too) In west there is Law to protect them from these sick vultures but unfortunately in Pakistan there is no such thing as Law. Pakistani media is also a B team of these vultures as most of them belong to rich media illiterate tycoons. Media despite there rowdiness, still gets dictation from either Govt or their favorite / supported politician. How is it possible that one TV channel is praising a politician while the other channel is portraying him/her as to have malign motives? Our media is twisted and won't even pick this issue as most of these media tycoons despite being rival are friends and will protect each other A r s e (as they may need them to cover their in the future)
    You can't expect CJ to take sou motu action on every evil in the society but these so called women organization who are too quick to condemn any thing remotely religious or human rights group should take this matter up if not by these so called Liberal parties. It's a shameful act and an utter disgrace.

    Posted 3 years ago on 14 Oct 2010 12:37 #
  4. olive branch

    Thanks a lot Khan Sahib for sharing the thought,but,I was just wondering is there any way the govt could act sensibly.I feel equally responsible because if all of us keep shifting the responsibilty to others how would we be able to bring the change.We should use all the forums to raise the voice against all the ill doings.I do not know this YBM personally but,when i read the facts about him I was literally shell shocked ...so how come govt and especially the man who put him on the seat has no idea of it .

    Posted 3 years ago on 14 Oct 2010 16:07 #
  5. tubelight

    Benazir Bhutto would be turning in her grave for her husband Asif Ali Zardari brought in a person who is morally decayed and has a tainted past. Intriguing to note that an ex-Zee employee YBM was introduced to this country by Nawaz Sharif in 1998. After Nawaz was arrested, YBM 'served' his new master Pervez Musharraf by ALL means. And now the party of Bhutto has installed a relic of the military dictator and Nawaz Sharif era back as MD PTV. Why?
    Why did the government of Benazir Bhutto, who suffered from male chauvinism throughout her life in this country and who introduced legislation to protect the women from such immoral characters, has appointed him MD PTV once it has been proved he is a serial harasser?

    Posted 3 years ago on 14 Oct 2010 19:21 #
  6. tubelight

    Btw, where is the PFUJ to protect the rights of one of their female colleague? If PFUJ can jump to protect the rights of Interior Minister Rehman Malik, why isn't taking up this case with the government for giving this post, being run on tax-payers money, to a morally and financially corrupt person?

    Posted 3 years ago on 14 Oct 2010 19:24 #
  7. "where is the PFUJ"

    PFUJ is mostly men, isn't it?

    "why isn't taking up this case with the government for giving this post, being run on tax-payers money, to a morally and financially corrupt person? "
    Most media men will tell you most media men are corrupt.

    Posted 3 years ago on 14 Oct 2010 19:29 #
  8. KHAN_Sahib

    @Olive branch,

    I can see where u r coming from but it's not shifting the blame... I don't have any hope from the present Govt to take up this matter as most of PPP members are involved in prostitution and Drinking. The Famous Qasre Naaz (where all MPA's stays in Karachi) on club road is known for hooker's paradise where they entertain these corrupt MPA's. Even to the fact that your President Zardari has been "Serviced" during his civil hospital jail stay by these hookers provided to him by the PPP MPA's. I personally think that excluding Qaim ali shah and Previous Abdullah shah... almost every MPA of PPP sindh was involved in Prostitution. So what do you expect from them?

    As regards to media.... I know quite few of the media anchor's personally... The one who was actually caught was "P.J.Mir" and was off air as a punishment. (Dr.Shahid Masood was one of the witness) so looking at the trend, I really doubt that these sold out anchor's will stand up for one of their colleagues. Here we need Talibaan style justice not after the death of either party 20 yrs down the line...

    Posted 3 years ago on 14 Oct 2010 20:25 #
  9. shimatoree

    A visit to the guillotine would cure not only Mr. Mirza but also the guy who has appointed him.

    Posted 3 years ago on 14 Oct 2010 20:32 #
  10. KHAN_Sahib

    It May come handy during pakistani revolution if there was one like French Revolution...

    Posted 3 years ago on 14 Oct 2010 20:34 #
  11. rehanahd

    In actual the so called politician r of so low character that they cant be even called insaan.,,, they always prefer to remain tun n enjoy flesh... name any one n u will find hundred witnesses....

    Posted 3 years ago on 16 Oct 2010 8:38 #
  12. tubelight

    my point is not discuss anybod's morals. my contention is why there is no rule of law here? why don't we quetsion the usage our taxes that we pay to the government who appoint such person doling them out huge benefits on our expenses. this person was introduced by Nawaz, retained by Pervez and now revived by Asif. Why? What is so special about him despite tha fact that the IFJ has declared him a harasser who used his official position to exploit one of his subordinate.
    The second point is (and I am not shifting the blame here) why the PFUJ, who champons the cause of journalists rights, is keeping a mum over it? why did they not take it up with the government? why didn't they question the minister of interior and minister of information to take action against YBM who sexually harassed a credible, senior female journalist

    Posted 3 years ago on 16 Oct 2010 10:12 #
  13. saira

    Recommends PFUJ, Govt to take strict action against culprit and steps
    to avoid such incidents in future

    ---An inquiry report issued by the world's most prestigious body
    working for the rights of journalists, International Federation of
    Journalists, IFJ, has declared that MD Dunya News Yousaf Beg Mirza's
    acts mounted to sexual harassment of Maheen Usmani, Dunya News senior
    correspondent.
    In a fact finding, lengthy inquiry conducted after the complaint of
    Maheen Usmani, the IFJ has given the verdict that by national and
    international definitions the late night phone call by YBM and the
    suggestive conversation

    That followed is sexual harassment of a female journalist who
    was his subordinate.

    The IFJ also referred to the definition of "sexual
    harassment" in the recently enacted anti sexual harassment law by the
    government of Pakistan and asked the government, PFUJ and media house
    owners to take strict measures to punish the culprits and avoid such
    happenings in future.

    The IFJ, has also urged the PFUJ and National Press Club to
    avoid meaningless territorial disputes in such serious matters and
    instead provide total support to the victims even if they are not the
    "registered" members of the journalists bodies.
    The IFJ had formed a probe committee on the complaint of
    Maheen Usmani, ex Dunya News correspondent, who had resigned after MD
    Dunya News Yousaf Beg Mirza harassed her.
    The journalist community, specially women journalists in
    Pakistan, have welcomed IFJ fact finding report and have appealed the
    PFUJ, NPC and other representative bodies to implement the
    recommendations of the IFJ in letter and spirit to punish creeps such
    as YBM who try to exploit employees working under them.
    Complete IFJ report is as under -

    Gender Equity and Sexual Harassment Inquiry, Pakistan Report1. Summary
    and RecommendationsSummaryThe International Federation of Journalists
    conducted an inquiry into allegations of sexual harassmentof Maheen
    Usmani at Dunya TV station in Pakistan in 2009.The inquiry aimed to
    identify local needs regarding support on gender equity and
    discriminationissues, advise on the development of appropriate gender
    policies for unions and media workplaces inPakistan and make
    recommendations on how local unions may best respond to such matters
    andpromote gender equity and non-discrimination within local unions
    and media work-places.Interviews were conducted with a range of
    relevant persons including union office bearers, print andelectronic
    media journalists, female journalists, women’s activists, management
    of Dunya TV and thecomplainant (in the latter’s case via email). As a
    result of these inquiries, a range of actions isrecommended which will
    provide better capacity for unions in Pakistan to represent
    womenjournalists. Recommendations are also made specific to the case
    of Maheen Usmani, who is not amember of the union.The status of women
    in Pakistan varies greatly with region, class and educational status.
    While acertain section of women has come a long way, a large section
    of women continue to occupy asecondary status as regards most
    indicators: education, health, political participation, economic
    statusand cultural norms.The Constitution of Pakistan recognises the
    fundamental rights of citizens to dignity of all persons,including
    women. Article 25 prohibits discrimination on the basis of gender.
    More specifically, in March2010, the President signed into law the
    Protection Against Harassment of Women at the WorkplaceAct, 2010.In
    terms of union activity, the 1970s and 1980s in Pakistan witnessed a
    highly politicised journalists’movement, with a few women journalists
    playing prominent roles. While the presence of womenjournalists has
    steadily increased to date, women in general avoid controversial
    bodies for a numberof reasons. The reluctance is solidified when it is
    perceived that unions do not take up concerns ofspecial relevance to
    women.Overall, it is clear that there is a lack of understanding
    within the Pakistan media about sexualharassment in the workplace, and
    the issue has not been dealt with as seriously as it should. Thecase
    of Maheen Usmani is a pointer to the need for institutional mechanisms
    to deal with sexualharassment and must be seen in the larger context
    of the need for broader sensitivity to women’srights. Systemic changes
    are needed to achieve positive outcomes for women journalists in
    Pakistan.RecommendationsRecommendations regarding sexual harassment1.
    Understand sexual harassment as a workplace issue that unions must be
    concerned about.Unions must help to promote professional workplaces
    where women feel secure.2. A nuanced understanding is particularly
    important as dealing with cases of sexual harassmentinvolves labour
    law and service rules, since dismissal of the complainant (as in the
    caseinvestigated) or dismissal of the accused could lead to conflict
    between union members. Anunderstanding of how to deal with such
    conflicts must be evolved in the abstract, and mustnot be dependent on
    specific cases.3. Ensure implementation of the recently enacted law on
    protection of women in the workplace,which requires the establishment
    of committees in every organisation. Alongside, set up“women’s cells”
    of unions – centrally, as well as in the larger media houses, so that
    womenjournalists have an easily accessible forum to which to direct
    complaints. Such a complaintsmechanism would go beyond encouraging
    colleagues to be “nice and decent”, and set upinstitutional mechanisms
    to create a workplace less hostile to women. Lobbying andadvocacy may
    be needed to ensure that all media houses set up mechanisms to deal
    withsexual harassment, in accordance with the new law.4. Issuing a
    “Code of Conduct” for workplaces that encompasses sexual harassment,
    andsetting up Special Committees or Women’s Cells as first-stop
    complaint mechanisms, woulddemonstrate the seriousness of unions in
    tackling sexual harassment in the workplace.5. Specifically, unions
    can take the following steps1:I. Create awareness about sexual
    harassment in the workplace, and the need tocombat it. This can be
    done through posters, handouts, pamphlets, bulletins,notices, buttons
    (something like ‘Zero Tolerance Zone for Sexual Harassment’).II.
    Ensure that the workplace has a policy to deal with sexual harassment
    in theworkplace, and has set up a Complaints Committee as required by
    law.III. Ensure that sexual harassment is listed as “misconduct” in
    the service rules of thecompany.IV. Lobby to ensure union
    representation on the Complaints Committee, to counterany trends
    toward anti-labour practices.V. Conduct workshops to promote gender
    sensitivity among union members.VI. Conduct workshops in self-defence
    and other skills in order to boost theconfidence of women union
    members.VII. Set up Gender Councils to take the issue forward.VIII.
    Support any woman who complains about sexual harassment, and assist
    her inpursuing justice.Recommendations regarding gender equity in
    unions1. Conduct gender-sensitisation workshops for union members,
    both male and female. A trainthe trainer workshop in gender equity,
    with equal participation of men and women, could be astarting point to
    raise issues on gender and women’s rights.2. Explore avenues to
    increase participation of women in unions, including
    leadershipworkshops and political education for women union activists.
    A serious discussion on quotas(affirmative action) reviewing the
    experience of other unions might be beneficial.3. Networking with
    women’s rights organisations with expertise in dealing with issues of
    sexualharassment and gender equity would be beneficial in terms of a
    sustained campaigndesigned in-country and based on local needs.
    Collaboration with local women’sorganisations (for example Aks, which
    was instrumental in the passage of the ProtectionAgainst Harassment of
    Women at the Workplace Act, 2010) would bring expertise in dealingwith
    cases of sexual harassment with the required sensitivity.4. The
    evolution and adoption of a Charter on Gender Equity (on the lines of
    that adopted by thefive media organisations in Sri Lanka), endorsed by
    the federal and provincial unions mightassist to ensure a commitment
    toward gender equity.Specific recommendations regarding Ms Usmani’s
    case1. Assistance in getting Ms Usmani’s dues: Ms Usmani is not a
    member of the union and anyunion is entitled to decline support to
    journalists who are not members. However, the union1 Excerpted from
    “Combating sexual harassment at the workplace” in A Handbook on Gender
    Equality at theWorkplace. Laxmi Murthy. IFJ. 2006.may find it useful
    in building broader support for its work if it were to help her in her
    case,details of which are appended as Annex 1.2. Expedite the
    publication of the report of the Inquiry Committee of the National
    Press Club, setup to inquire into the matter.2. Full report of the
    investigationThe IFJ conducted an inquiry into allegations of sexual
    harassment of Maheen Usmani at Dunya TVstation in Pakistan in 2009.
    The inquiry examined Usmani’s allegation and the manner in which it
    wasdealt with by Dunya’s management and local journalists’ unions.The
    inquiry aimed to:• Identify local needs regarding support on gender
    equity and discrimination issues.• Advise on the development of
    appropriate gender policies for unions and media workplaces
    inPakistan.• Make recommendations on how local unions may best respond
    to such matters and promotegender equity and non-discrimination within
    local unions and media workplaces.Key persons interviewed included:
    Office bearers of the PFUJ, PUJ and KUJ; senior journalists in
    theprint and electronic media; women activists; women journalists in
    the electronic media; andrepresentatives of the management of Dunya
    TV. An interview over email was conducted with MsMaheen Usmani, the
    complainant.ContextThe status of women in Pakistan varies greatly with
    region, class and educational status. While acertain section of women
    has come a long way, a large section of women continue to occupy
    asecondary status as regards most indicators: education, health,
    political participation, economic statusand cultural norms. Following
    the Islamisation of the policy in the Zia ul-Haq era in the late
    1970s,women were further burdened by discriminatory Hudood ordinances,
    under which, to cite just oneexample, women who were raped, were
    punished for adultery. Cases such as the gang-rape ofMukhtaran Mai
    ordered as an act of revenge by a community council, are commonly
    cited asexamples of violence against women. The Women’s Protection
    Bill of 2006 laid the ground forbringing crimes such as rape under
    secular law.Legal FrameworkThe Constitution of Pakistan recognises the
    fundamental rights of citizens to dignity of all persons,including
    women and Article 25 prohibits discrimination on the basis of gender.
    More specifically, inMarch this year, the President signed into law
    the Protection Against Harassment of Women at theWorkplace Act, 2010.
    The Act2 provides for a broad definition of harassment to mean “any
    unwelcomesexual advance, request for sexual favours or other verbal or
    written communication or physicalconduct of a sexual nature or
    sexually demeaning attitudes, causing interference with
    workperformance or creating an intimidating, hostile or offensive work
    environment, or the attempt topunish the complainant for refusal to
    comply to such a request or is made a condition foremployment.” If
    guilt is proved following an impartial inquiry, minor penalties
    include censure,withholding of promotion or increment for specified
    periods, and recovery of compensation payable toa complainant from pay
    or any other source of the accused. Major penalties include demotion
    to alower post or time-scale or to a lower stage in a time-scale,
    compulsory retirement, removal fromservice, dismissal from service,
    and fine, a part of which can be used as compensation for
    thecomplainant.2http://www.aasha.org.pk/Women_Harassment_Docs/THE%20PROTECTION%20AGAINST%20HARASSMENT%20OF%20WOMEN%20AT%20THE%20WORKPLACE%20ACT%202010.pdfWomen
    in the unionsThe 1970s and ‘80s in Pakistan witnessed a highly
    politicised journalists’ movement, with a fewwomen journalists playing
    prominent roles. During the 1978 movement against General
    Zia’sdictatorial regime, Lala Rukh went to jail with her one-year-old
    son. Others like Shin Farukh, MehnaazRehman, Farida Hafiz stand out as
    dynamic women journalist activists. A few went on to take onleadership
    roles in journalist bodies and media houses. Among these were Fauzia
    Shahid, whobecame Secretary General of the PFUJ, Umaira Athar who went
    on to become Vice President of theKarachi Press Club and Razia Bhatti
    the editor of The Herald. However, these individuals areexceptions,
    with the norm being a very low representation of women in the unions,
    both as membersand as office bearers.The presence of women journalists
    has steadily increased (a survey undertaken by the PFUJ in 2006counted
    about 300 full-time women journalists across Pakistan). Previously,
    most women in the unioncame from political backgrounds, with left-wing
    progressive views. Today, television offers the avenuefor increased
    numbers of women entering journalism. Therefore, there is less
    pre-existing politicalorientation. There are very few are bureau
    chiefs or reporters, although a majority of the anchors, talkshowhosts
    and producers are women, But when it comes to the union, they are too
    often notconsidered “regular” journalists, and hence not encouraged
    into membership of the unions. Thus thevisible boom in women in the
    media may not be properly reflected in union membership.In general,
    today, women journalists tend to avoid controversial bodies. Those who
    are focused ontheir careers may not see the need to join unions if
    they do not recognise them as integral toprofessional growth.
    Moreover, unions require undertaking activities that are perceived
    as“unpleasant” and risky, such as protests, engaging with recalcitrant
    employers, street demonstrationsetc, and women, who are burdened with
    domestic chores as well, may be reluctant to spend their timein these
    activities. The reluctance is solidified when it is perceived that
    unions do not take up concernsof special relevance to women, be it
    sexual harassment in the workplace, or demanding facilities forwomen
    such as night-drops or separate wash-rooms.The case of Ms Maheen
    UsmaniThe case in briefMs Maheen Usmani was the Islamabad-based
    correspondent of Dunya News (head quartered inLahore) who had joined
    the launch team in November 2008. She alleged that she had been
    sexuallyharassed by the Managing Director, Yusuf Beg Mirza, who she
    said had made a call on her mobilephone at about 10 pm on 11 May 2009.
    The entire episode was “detestable”, she says. When noapology was
    forthcoming, and she was further victimised at work and her
    professional growthhindered, she decided to resign on 22 June. An
    in-house inquiry, as well as one by the National PressClub, were
    conducted.• The phone call in question was made to Ms Usmani by Mr
    Yusuf Baig Mirza, the MD ofDunya TV. It can be concluded that it was
    probably as suggestive and objectionable as MsUsmani claims it was. It
    is also likely that it was not the first of such calls.• If this is
    so, then the phone call by Mr Yusuf Baig Mirza would appear to
    constitute an act ofsexual harassment, as per international
    definitions (ref CEDAW), as well as recently enacteddomestic law.• The
    timing of her complaint must not be linked with external factors like
    rival news channelsexploiting the situation etc. She probably made the
    complaint because it was getting too muchto ignore. It can be
    concluded that a Policy on Sexual Harassment at Dunya TV, claimed
    tohave been in place when the incident occurred, seems to have been
    developed after theincident in question. The document itself, however,
    is a useful one.• Ms Usmani is not a member of the union, but sought
    its assistance.• The union may have been more effective initially to
    apply internal pressure and attempt topressure management to deal with
    the case promptly and fairly. This would have beenpossible even though
    Ms Usmani is not a union member, and may have generated widersupport
    for the union. The publicity around the case worked in a negative
    manner, generatingrumours and creating factions within the union and
    media fraternity, rather than working tocreate public awareness about
    sexual harassment in the workplace.• There is a lack of understanding
    about sexual harassment in the workplace. There is a needto
    distinguish between consensual relationships in the workplace from
    non-consensual,unwelcome advances.
    • The issue of sexual harassment in the workplace has not been dealt
    with adequately withinthe media. (It must be noted that until this
    case, not a single complaint of sexual harassmenthas ever been
    submitted to the PFUJ, according to the PFUJ office bearers.) This
    lacunaneeds to be addressed in a systematic manner. The case of Ms
    Usmani is a pointer to theneed for institutional mechanisms to deal
    with the issue.
    • The case must be seen in the larger context of a lack of sensitivity
    to women’s rights. Theunion needs to consider systemic changes in its
    approach to dealing with such issues.
    RecommendationsRecommendations regarding sexual harassment
    1. Understand sexual harassment as a workplace issue that unions must
    be concerned about.Unions must help to promote professional workplaces
    where women feel secure.2. A nuanced understanding is particularly
    important as dealing with cases of sexual harassmentinvolve labour law
    and service rules, since dismissal of the complainant (as in the
    caseinvestigated) or dismissal of the accused could lead to conflict
    between union members. Anunderstanding of how to deal with such
    conflicts must be evolved in the abstract, and mustnot be dependent on
    specific cases.3. Ensure implementation of the recently enacted law on
    protection of women at the workplace,which requires the setting up of
    Committees in every organisation. Alongside, set up“women’s cells” of
    unions – centrally, as well as in the larger media houses, so that
    womenjournalists have an easily accessible forum to which to direct
    complaints. Such a complaintsmechanism would go beyond “nice and
    decent” colleagues, and set up institutionalmechanisms to create a
    workplace less hostile to women. Lobbying and advocacy to ensurethat
    all media houses set up mechanisms to deal with sexual harassment, in
    accordance withthe new law.4. Issuing a “Code of Conduct” for
    workplaces that encompasses sexual harassment, andsetting up Special
    Committees or Women’s Cells as first-stop complaint mechanisms
    woulddemonstrate the seriousness of unions in tackling rampant sexual
    harassment in theworkplace.5. Specifically, unions can take the
    following steps3:I. Create awareness about sexual harassment at the
    workplace, and the need tocombat it. This can be done through posters,
    handouts, pamphlets, bulletins,notices, buttons (something like ‘Zero
    Tolerance Zone for Sexual Harassment’).II. Ensure that the workplace
    has a policy to deal with sexual harassment at theworkplace, and has
    set up a Complaints Committee as required by law.III. Ensure that
    sexual harassment is listed as ‘misconduct’ in the service rules ofthe
    company.3 Excerpted from “Combating sexual harassment at the
    workplace”, by Laxmi Murthy, in “AHandbook on gender equality at the
    workplace,” IFJ, 2006.IV. Lobby to ensure union representation on the
    Complaints Committee, to counterany trends towards anti-labour
    practices.V. Conduct workshops to promote gender sensitivity among
    union members.VI. Conduct workshops in self-defence and other skills
    in order to boost theconfidence of women union members.VII. Set up
    Gender Councils to take the issue forward.VIII. Support any woman who
    complains about sexual harassment, and assist her inpursuing
    justice.Recommendations regarding gender equity in unions1. Conduct
    gender sensitisation workshops for union members, both male and
    female. A trainthe trainer workshop in gender equity, with equal
    participation of men and women, could be astarting point to raise
    issues on gender and women’s rights.2. Explore avenues to increase
    participation of women in the union, including leadershipworkshops,
    political education for women union activists. A serious discussion on
    quotas(affirmative action), reviewing the experience of other unions
    might be beneficial.3. Networking with women’s rights organisations
    with expertise in dealing with issues of sexualharassment and gender
    equity, would be beneficial in terms of a sustained campaigndesigned
    in-country and based on local needs. Collaboration with local
    women’sorganisations (for example Aks, which was instrumental in the
    passage of the ProtectionAgainst Harassment of Women at the Workplace
    Act, 2010) would bring expertise of dealingwith cases of sexual
    harassment with the required sensitivity.4. The evolution and adoption
    of a Charter on Gender Equity (on the lines of that adopted by thefive
    media organisations in Sri Lanka), endorsed by the federal and
    provincial unions might gotowards ensuring a commitment towards gender
    equity.Specific recommendations regarding Ms Usmani’s case1.
    Assistance in getting Ms Usmani’s dues: Ms Usmani is not a member of
    the union and anyunion is entitled to decline support to journalists
    who are not members. However, the unionmay find it useful in building
    support for its work if it were to help her in her case, details
    ofwhich are appended as Annex 1.2. Expedite the publication of the
    report of the Inquiry Committee of the National Press Club, setup to
    inquire into the matter.
    Laxmi Murthy

    Posted 3 years ago on 17 Oct 2010 9:17 #
  14. @Saira
    "IFJ, has declared that MD Dunya News Yousaf Beg Mirza's
    acts mounted to sexual harassment of Maheen Usmani, Dunya News senior correspondent."

    And hence the promotion of sorts.
    BTW: no need for a separate thread. Could easily have gone under http://pkpolitics.com/discuss/topic/new-ptv-md-yousaf-beg-mirza-another-diamond-in-the-governments-crown

    Posted 3 years ago on 17 Oct 2010 9:20 #
  15. haroon

    In 2008, the Egyptian Centre for Women's Rights (ECWR) released shocking statistics that stated that 83 per cent of Egyptian women and 98 per cent of foreign women in Egypt reported exposure to sexual harassment. Out of 1,010 Egyptian women surveyed by the Cairo-based NGO, nearly half reported being subjected to harassment on a daily basis, ranging from lewd comments to molestation.

    "We receive complaints from women about various forms of sexual harassment. These range from salacious gestures and groping to impertinent compliments or outright chases on public streets. Subsequently, we have conducted several studies that have proven one thing above all else: Sexual harassment occurs regardless of age, dress or time of day. Women are victims simply because they are women," said ECWR chairwoman Nehad Abu Al Komsan.

    More than 60 per cent of the respondents -- including females -- suggested that scantily clad women were most at risk. But the study concluded that the majority of the victims of harassment were modestly dressed women wearing the hijab. Contrary to expectations, the male perpetrators made little distinction between women wearing a veil and those who were not. "We found that a veil does not protect women as we thought," says Abu Al Komsan. "More than 75 per cent of women in Egypt are veiled but are still harassed. And 9 per cent wear the niqab -- the complete face cover -- so they are fully covered."

    While both men and women surveyed said that short skirts and tight clothes triggered harassment, Nora Khalid, 31, told Weekend Review: "All my female colleagues advised me to wear the hijab to spare myself any advances from passers-by, just to find that women in the hijab were the most frequent targets of unwanted comments and touching on the street."

    "As women, we follow our grandmother's advice -- not to come home late, walk in a crowded area because people can protect you and never walk down a dark or desolate street -- and we know all this very well," Khalid said. However, Abu Al Komsan said: "But what [our research showed] was something completely different from the stereotypes -- sexual harassment occurring in crowded areas, even if the women were covered from head to toe."
    all readers available internet compare sexual harrashment ration in muslim countries, modern muslim countries and non muslims countries.
    you can seen saudi arabi and iran having minimum ratio of sexual harrashment because using hijab
    not using hijab countries as usa and europe having ration as every 2 minutes 3 girls raped, also you can see in pakistan also.

    Posted 3 years ago on 17 Oct 2010 9:26 #
  16. ideas2010

    YBM should go prison because womens are playing vital rule to be equal rights like men how he dare to blaikmail a lady journalist..shame on him..

    Posted 3 years ago on 17 Oct 2010 9:27 #
  17. haroon

    all readers available internet compare sexual harrashment ration in muslim countries, modern muslim countries and non muslims countries.
    you can seen saudi arabi and iran having minimum ratio of sexual harrashment because using hijab
    not using hijab countries as usa and europe having ration as every 2 minutes 3 girls raped, also you can see in pakistan also.

    Posted 3 years ago on 17 Oct 2010 19:15 #
  18. SufiSoul

    Modern women is psychologically always more exposed to such harrasement.
    ISLAM teaches you again and again not to come out with your attractive Parts visible but todays modern ones would violate such rules and hence crying for the JUSTICE.
    This AZAAB is from TOP over such Modren ones YBM and others are just ASBAB to such AZAABS.
    I dont know how this countrywise advertisement over different sites of this incidence would effect YBM?As from top to bottom things are happening like the same.
    I would like to condemn first the Maheen's openness to such abuse and violating the NATURE's LAW than i would like to advice YBM to try to control himself rather than indulging in such controversies.
    Maheen's case is illogical here by exposing herself to such happenings daily by preparing herself with Makeups and etc for Office and than SHouting over such nagative responsives from opposite sex.
    Women without Hijab is always Under LA"ANAT by 60'000 Angels till she going back to home.
    So this is just a result of that LA"ANAT you are earning daily by not wearing Hijab nothing else.YBM is just a BAHANA for your curse here.
    You will understand if you take my this post positively although it is very difficult for you,just estimating here.

    Thanx

    Posted 3 years ago on 17 Oct 2010 22:54 #
  19. @tubelight
    this person was introduced by Nawaz, retained by Pervez and now revived by Asif. Why? What is so special about him despite tha fact that the IFJ has declared him a harasser who used his official position to exploit one of his subordinate.
    Like Musharraf's appointment, another feather in Nawaz's cap. What is so special about him? Well, I think you know already. He is a very successful p!mp whose specialty it is to provide starlets to the politicians. And he is given these positions to help him be more 'productive'. Have no doubts about that!

    The second point is (and I am not shifting the blame here) why the PFUJ, who champons the cause of journalists rights, is keeping a mum over it? why did they not take it up with the government? why didn't they question the minister of interior and minister of information to take action against YBM who sexually harassed a credible, senior female journalist
    What makes you think PFUJ should have an issue with this? They only rights of journalists they are interested in championing is their 'right' to plots. Many a journalists have been killed without a whimper from PFUJ. Any mention of PFUJ brings to my mind case of journalist Hayatullah Khan. His mistake was to report the very first drone strike and publish pictures of the missile parts. For that he was picked up, tortured for over six months and then killed and his body dumped in a field. A few months later, a bomb was planted next to the wall of his house that killed his wife (luckily(?) his young children survived. What did PFUJ do? They stayed silent both times.

    Posted 3 years ago on 18 Oct 2010 4:03 #
  20. Beenai

    all type of corrupts from all over Pakistan;can come and join the team of Best Corrupts of Pakistan 2010 .

    Posted 3 years ago on 18 Oct 2010 5:06 #

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